Hi blogfam!

It’s the second edition of ‘What’s hot’ (first edition), I know I had said it would be weekly but with the look of things, fortnightly seems more realistic for now. let’s get cracking, shall we?

  • Falz vs yahoo boys

So last week, Falz, a Nigerian musician, was under fire on twitter for saying that Nigerian musicians should stop using their music to glorify fraudsters. I was stunned to say the least but upon deeper reflection I remembered that such reaction is actually not an aberration in today’s Nigeria. Only two weeks ago, the hashtag #freeevans was trending as an appeal to release a Notorious Kidnapper Evans who has terrorised many Nigerians. Prior to that,a Nigerian Musician Dammy Krane was arrested in the US for credit card theft and some Nigerians on Twitter were soliciting for sympathy towards him.

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What all of these reveal is the gradual erosion of the moral fibre of the Nigerian society in the most appalling manner, we have sunk so low that a section of us have now become apologists for Kidnappers and criminals. This is beyond shameful and perhaps it’s about time to reflect on our values and the kind of society we aspire to build. With a citizenry like this, perhaps we deserve the leaders we get!

  • Buhari’s voice note

Nigeria’s President Muhammadu Buhari has been away for about 50 days now with no form of official communication to the Nigerian people, as in, radio silence. He finally sends a message to felicitate with those celebrating the Eid-il-fitr and it’s in ”Hausa’. Save for the fact that not all Nigerian muslims are hausa, for a President that has been routinely accused of being tribalistic, the optics are absolutely terrible and does nothing to unify a country that is currently heavily divided. By addressing only a section of the country, it not only undermines all the efforts of the acting President who has been taking active steps to foster unity, it sends a very strong message that he doesn’t give a damn about the rest of Nigeria.

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  • World Bank and private finance

In April, the World Bank President Jim Yong Kim spoke at the London School of Economic (LSE) spoke about the Bank’s strategic to scale up the funds needed to finance development by acting as a broker of some sort between countries in need of funds and private capital. In addition to that he said that the Bank would also work towards de-risking (reducing the risks) developing countries to make them conducive for private investment.

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In response to this, two professors from the University of Cambridge and Edinburgh respectively, wrote an article highlighting the potential pitfalls of this new approach. They argue that ‘de-risking’ developing countries is basically code word for neoliberal structural adjustment policies that have been largely unbeneficial for developing countries in the past. I thought the article asked really critical questions.Read here.

Things I am reading

  • Mckinsey recently released a report about Chinese engagement in Africa, I have read the executive summary but I haven’t yet finished reading the entire publication. So far, I have found it pretty interesting and insightful as it examines the nature of Chinese businesses in Africa and how this varies per country. You can read it here and I would make sure to provide a summary for you once I am done.
  • The Natural Resource Governance Institute (NRGI) recently published the 2017 Resource Governance Index where Nigeria was ranked 55 out of 89 countries. It has some interesting facts about Nigeria’s oil and Gas industry, pretty sobering stuff. I should do a blog on this later in the week.

 I wish you all an absolutely productive and inspiring week! Feel free to share your comments, thoughts and any interesting news/articles you see, I would absolutely love to engage with you.

Amaka.

 

 

 

 

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